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Bird Photography 2020 - Replacing the previous Bird topic of 2019.  Rate Topic 
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Posted by Iain: Sat Oct 24th, 2020 11:12 501st Post
GeoffR wrote:
So far I have found mine to be roundish and black but unfortunately not a rarity. :lol:



Posted by Richard_M: Mon Oct 26th, 2020 00:18 502nd Post
A few snaps from the weekend in one of our local coastal reserves. These reserves are great for birding and native orchids. 

Nikon D500 with 200-500mm lens

#1 Grey Butcherbird


#2 Rufous Whistler


#3 Eastern Rosella


#4 White-plumed Honeyeater


#5 Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike


#6 Shining Bronze-Cuckoo



Posted by Robert: Mon Oct 26th, 2020 07:03 503rd Post
Thank's for posting Richard, lovely specimen images. 

Particularly like that you took the trouble to number and name them.  Despite that they are all so nice I can't single one out for special praise, except perhaps #3 which is very eye-catching, perhaps a tighter crop of the left and bottom?   

Do you have any orchid images?  Our range of orchids in the UK is somewhat limited and for most of the more special species they are very rare to find due to robbery.  If you do have any flora images please will you post them in a new thread... 😇



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Posted by Richard_M: Mon Oct 26th, 2020 08:20 504th Post
Robert wrote:
Thank's for posting Richard, lovely specimen images. 

Particularly like that you took the trouble to number and name them.  Despite that they are all so nice I can't single one out for special praise, except perhaps #3 which is very eye-catching, perhaps a tighter crop of the left and bottom?   

Do you have any orchid images?  Our range of orchids in the UK is somewhat limited and for most of the more special species they are very rare to find due to robbery.  If you do have any flora images please will you post them in a new thread... 😇
Thank you for your kind comments Robert.

I would normally crop a few of these, or photograph them, in portrait. We’re currently getting images for our annual family calendar. This year it is birds, hence why most of these are in landscape to help my wife choose which images to go into the selection folder, then from there select the ones to be included. The Grey Butcherbird was never going to be a contender hence the portrait presentation.

With regards native orchids, yes I do have many images which I will start sharing a few in a new post.



Posted by Eric: Mon Oct 26th, 2020 09:31 505th Post
A lovely selection of well captured images Richard. Excellent.

You are blessed with some lovely coloured species in your country ...and strong light. 
Sadly we suffer from damp dark miserable lighting a lot of the time here in the UK. 😞 

I would agree with Robert’s crop comments on image 3 but also add that the light from behind the bird subdues the breast colours being in shadow... which might be a less than ideal choice.  
I also think the pose in image 5 is very ‘static’, showing just the back. The branch (don’t you love tree branches when photographing small birds in them ? ) coming out of its head detracts from the image.  

Just my 2 cents.



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Posted by Robert: Mon Oct 26th, 2020 09:40 506th Post
Richard_M wrote:
With regards native orchids, yes I do have many images which I will start sharing a few in a new post.
My pleasure!

I look forward to seeing some of your orchid images.  Mine are largely limited to botanic garden visits, which is far from ideal with other visitors jostling for position and limitations on the use of tripods, practical, if not by regulations.

Last year I had the excitement of seeking out a rare, non-native orchid which I believe was a native of Canada, on the Isle of Skye, with a well known Norwegian botanist. We found it but I had been using her Z7 and didn't think to ask for the image files I made on her camera so I don't have any decent images, the iPhone snaps I took (mainly to get the GPS coordinates) were very poor as the red of the flower oversaturated the sensor.



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Posted by Iain: Mon Oct 26th, 2020 21:26 507th Post
A nice set of images Richard, the bright colours are great. If only we had a few of those here.



Posted by Richard_M: Mon Oct 26th, 2020 21:32 508th Post
Eric wrote:
A lovely selection of well captured images Richard. Excellent.

You are blessed with some lovely coloured species in your country ...and strong light. 
Sadly we suffer from damp dark miserable lighting a lot of the time here in the UK. 😞 

I would agree with Robert’s crop comments on image 3 but also add that the light from behind the bird subdues the breast colours being in shadow... which might be a less than ideal choice.  
I also think the pose in image 5 is very ‘static’, showing just the back. The branch (don’t you love tree branches when photographing small birds in them ? ) coming out of its head detracts from the image.  


Just my 2 cents.
Thank you Eric.

We don't always have good light here in Melbourne, after all we're known to have 4 seasons in the one day. There is a saying, if you don't like the weather, just wait 15mins :-) 

With regards the Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike, there was also a juvenile near by 



The images posted plus others which I haven't posted were all taken in under an hour. We've been under strict Covid lockdown for weeks where we were only allowed to travel 5km from home, and for 1hr per day. Luckily these restriction's are starting to be eased.

As for the Eastern Rosella I did get a few images of them on the day.



While many of our local reserves have a good selection of birds and native orchids, they also have a lot of snakes. Looking for orchids, at least you're looking down, when out birding you need to keep looking where you're walking.

Lowlands Copperhead





Where possible if its a dreary overcast day I try to photograph birds against a backdrop other than the sky. It doesn't always work out that way.

Here are a few images taken on dull overcast days

#1 Sacred Kingfisher


#2 White-naped Honeyeater


#3 Red-browed Finch


#4 Eastern Yellow Robin



Posted by Richard_M: Mon Oct 26th, 2020 21:34 509th Post
Robert wrote:
My pleasure!

I look forward to seeing some of your orchid images.  Mine are largely limited to botanic garden visits, which is far from ideal with other visitors jostling for position and limitations on the use of tripods, practical, if not by regulations.

Last year I had the excitement of seeking out a rare, non-native orchid which I believe was a native of Canada, on the Isle of Skye, with a well known Norwegian botanist. We found it but I had been using her Z7 and didn't think to ask for the image files I made on her camera so I don't have any decent images, the iPhone snaps I took (mainly to get the GPS coordinates) were very poor as the red of the flower oversaturated the sensor.
Always special when you find something which is rare or unique. A pity you didn't get a copy of the files.



Posted by Richard_M: Mon Oct 26th, 2020 21:34 510th Post
Iain wrote:
A nice set of images Richard, the bright colours are great. If only we had a few of those here. Thank you Iain



Posted by jk: Mon Oct 26th, 2020 22:16 511th Post
Good shots Richard.

You have the D500 with 200-500, do you have the XT3 with 100-400 as well?  If so how do they compare as birding setups?  Of course this coming week we have a firmware update for the XT3 that promises faster AF.



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Posted by Richard_M: Mon Oct 26th, 2020 23:15 512th Post
jk wrote:
Good shots Richard.

You have the D500 with 200-500, do you have the XT3 with 100-400 as well?  If so how do they compare as birding setups?  Of course this coming week we have a firmware update for the XT3 that promises faster AF.
Thank you Jonathon.

Yes I do have the XT3, but not the 100-400 lens. I do have the Panasonic 100-400 which I use from time to time with the Olympus E-M1 MKII.



Posted by Graham Whistler: Tue Oct 27th, 2020 11:27 513th Post
Richard super shots great to see some new pictures and so well taken.



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Posted by Richard_M: Tue Oct 27th, 2020 22:43 514th Post
Graham Whistler wrote:
Richard super shots great to see some new pictures and so well taken.
Thank you Graham

Hopefully some of our great birding spots will reopen once Covid restrictions are lifted. I miss the birds of prey










Posted by jk: Wed Oct 28th, 2020 10:34 515th Post
Great shots Richard.
So sharp.



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Posted by Richard_M: Thu Oct 29th, 2020 01:51 516th Post
jk wrote:
Great shots Richard.
So sharp.
Thank you Jonathon!



Posted by Graham Whistler: Fri Oct 30th, 2020 12:12 517th Post
Richard we are enjoying your pictures, thank you again for sharing them with us. I have been to Sydney only for a short time on my way to N Zealand 2006 so now with great regret that I did not see more of your amazing country and bird life.



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Posted by Graham Whistler: Fri Oct 30th, 2020 15:25 518th Post
Richard this is one for you  I took this Kingfisher locally last year Nikon D500 with 500mm Nikon  lens 1/3200 sec at F4 3200 ISO

Click here to comment on this image.



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Posted by Richard_M: Fri Oct 30th, 2020 17:43 519th Post
Richard this is one for you  I took this Kingfisher locally last year Nikon D500 with 500mm Nikon  lens 1/3200 sec at F4 3200 ISO That is a great photo Graham. Focus and SS are spot on. Well done!



Posted by Richard_M: Sun Nov 1st, 2020 20:03 520th Post
It was a foggy and overcast morning when I went out birding on the weekend. 


#1 Sulphur-crested Cockatoo


#2 Eastern Spinebill


#3 Yellow-faced Honeyeater


#4 Silvereye


#5 Scarlet Honeyeater



Posted by jk: Sun Nov 1st, 2020 22:29 521st Post
Great set of images again Richard.
Those yellow faced Honeyeaters were fairly plentiful around the trees where I was staying south of Adelaide but they were very shy and keep themselves very well hidden.

The Scarlet Honeyeater is very spectacular.


Keep us entertained with tropical birds and send some sunshine, it has been typical grey, rainy and blustery here. 
FYI: No, I am not talking about Boris Johnson.



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Posted by Richard_M: Tue Nov 3rd, 2020 19:33 522nd Post
Thank you Jonathon

As we've had a few consecutive days of zero covid cases, hopefully this weekend the restrictions will be lifted and we'll be able to travel again. It'll be great to visit a few of the good birding spots we have.

Yesterday was Melbourne Cup, so I ventured out early to a local reserve.

#1 Sacred Kingfisher


#2 Sacred Kingfisher


#3 Sacred Kingfisher


#4 White-naped Honeyeater


#5 White-naped Honeyeater


#6 Yellow-faced Honeyeater


#7 Grey Shrike-thrush


#8 White-eared Honeyeater


#9 White-plumed Honeyeater


#10 Common Starling



Posted by Graham Whistler: Wed Nov 4th, 2020 12:05 523rd Post
More good pixs Richard, your Starling much the same as ours.

Click here to comment on this image.



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Posted by jk: Thu Nov 5th, 2020 16:22 524th Post
I am no bird expert or even un-expert as I certainly dont know many of the names.

Are starlings in Australia the same species as Starlings in UK?  Probably named the same by settlers as they looked similar but I dont think that they are the same species due to geographic distance.  I guess they must have come from a similar lineage though.



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Posted by Richard_M: Thu Nov 5th, 2020 19:51 525th Post
They are an introduced species in Australia

https://www.birdsinbackyards.net/species/Sturnus-vulgaris


Habitat:

Once a common bird of European deciduous woodlands (now in more rural and urban areas), the Common Starling was introduced into Australia in the late 1850s through to 1870. It has become well established and is expanding its range.



Posted by jk: Thu Nov 5th, 2020 21:05 526th Post
So what has happened to the removal of non-indigenous species program?  Does it not apply to these starlings?
The cane toads are being removed.



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Posted by Richard_M: Thu Nov 5th, 2020 22:38 527th Post
jk wrote:
So what has happened to the removal of non-indigenous species program?  Does it not apply to these starlings?
The cane toads are being removed.
I have absolutely no idea. If the cane toads are being removed, hopefully they will do the same with the Queensland population :lol:



Posted by jk: Thu Nov 5th, 2020 22:57 528th Post
Richard_M wrote:
I have absolutely no idea. If the cane toads are being removed, hopefully they will do the same with the Queensland population :lol: I trust you mean the toads not the people!  :lol:



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Posted by Richard_M: Thu Nov 5th, 2020 23:19 529th Post
jk wrote:
I trust you mean the toads not the people!  :lol: Here in AU it is customary to hang s***t on any other state other than the one you reside in, particularly when it comes to sport. Queenslanders are colloquially referred to as Banana Benders :-)



Posted by Richard_M: Sat Nov 7th, 2020 19:12 530th Post
A quick wander around one of our local gardens yesterday


#1 Dusky Woodswallow


#2 Superb Fairy-wren


#3 Eastern Yellow Robin


#4 Red-browed Finch


#5 Spotted Pardalote


#6 New Holland Honeyeater


#7 Welcome Swallow, feeding time


#8 I don't think the chick is too impressed with the meal  :)



Posted by Graham Whistler: Sun Nov 8th, 2020 13:52 531st Post
There is no end to the great birdlife in your part of the world, keep em comming!



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Posted by Graham Whistler: Tue Nov 24th, 2020 12:01 532nd Post
Not a regular, at the bottom of our garden this morning! Nikon D850 500mm AF-S PF lens 1/800 sec f9 1000 ISO

Click here to comment on this image.



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Posted by Robert: Tue Nov 24th, 2020 15:59 533rd Post
Nice one Graham.



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Posted by Graham Whistler: Tue Nov 24th, 2020 22:13 534th Post
Later today problem: "I got here first this is my flutter-butter!" D850 500mm PF lens. 1/1600 sec f5.6  ISO 3200 quite dull light.

Click here to comment on this image.

Last edited on Tue Nov 24th, 2020 22:18 by Graham Whistler



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Posted by Eric: Wed Nov 25th, 2020 13:07 535th Post
Graham Whistler wrote:
Not a regular, at the bottom of our garden this morning! Nikon D850 500mm AF-S PF lens 1/800 sec f9 1000 ISO

Click here to comment on this image.
Wow!



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Posted by blackfox: Sun Nov 29th, 2020 10:05 536th Post
morning all , some snow bunting shots from this week on Rhyl beach ... olympus omd1-mk2 + olympus 100-400is  

Click here to comment on this image.


Click here to comment on this image.



Click here to comment on this image.



Posted by Graham Whistler: Sun Nov 29th, 2020 11:24 537th Post
Super little bird thanks for sharing them with us. Hope you are keeping well and good to see the Olympus is still taking good pixs for you.



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Posted by blackfox: Sun Nov 29th, 2020 16:37 538th Post
thanks graham ,yep all well despite the travel restrictions being imposed on us



Posted by Graham Whistler: Wed Dec 2nd, 2020 21:04 539th Post
Bit of fun on a very cold dull morning with a small flock of town pigeons flying round and round our house. Had a go with 10 frames sec D850 500mm PF lens 9 point focus 1/2000 sec with +2 extra exp against light sky. Picked out birds from 4 best shots to make a comp image on this rather bland landscape in Photoshop. Needed a bit more work on noise in the birds.  

Click here to comment on this image.



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Posted by Eric: Thu Dec 3rd, 2020 19:54 540th Post
This lady did the same to the black birds feeding on the lawn. She swooped in at them, missing one lucky chap by inches. 

She then circled and landed in the Acacia tree of the neighbours garden...quite a long way off in low overcast light rain, so not ideal exposure conditions even for the D850/500mm+1.4tc (and a heavy crop!)



Click here to comment on this image.


She kept her eyes on me....



Click here to comment on this image.

Last edited on Thu Dec 3rd, 2020 19:58 by Eric



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Posted by jk: Fri Dec 4th, 2020 09:01 541st Post
Good shots of the hawk Eric.
The 500mm certainly performs very well.



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Posted by Iain: Sat Dec 5th, 2020 14:58 542nd Post
A Nutty taken with the good old D3.

D3C_3866 by Iain Clyne, on Flickr



Posted by jk: Sat Dec 5th, 2020 18:06 543rd Post
Great shot of the Nuthatch.  
Beautiful exposure.



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Posted by Iain: Sat Dec 5th, 2020 18:16 544th Post
jk wrote:
Great shot of the Nuthatch.  
Beautiful exposure.
The old D3 can still produce the goods.



Posted by Eric: Mon Dec 7th, 2020 20:27 545th Post
Iain wrote:
The old D3 can still produce the goods. My favourite camera!  It just delivers.



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Posted by Richard_M: Mon Dec 7th, 2020 20:39 546th Post
A wander around one of our local gardens on the weekend.

#1 New Holland Honeyeater enjoying the Kangaroo Paw


#2 New Holland Honeyeater


#3 European Goldfinch


#4 Masked Lapwing


#5 Willie Wagtail


#6 Dusky Woodswallow


#7 Red-browed Finch


#8 Yellow-faced Honeyeater


#9 Spotted Pardalote


#10 Superb Fairy-wren


#11 Welcome Swallow



Posted by Eric: Mon Dec 7th, 2020 20:41 547th Post
I was sitting in the armchair looking out at the subzero icy garden and the myriad of blackbirds, starling, pigeons and doves feeding off the items we had scattered on the lawn. This dove was waiting for its turn....



Click here to comment on this image.






My attention turned to the blackbird at the base of the bird table. I believe I am right in saying it’s an immigrant from Netherlands (predominantly black beak and much more sooty looking than UK male blackbirds).....



Click here to comment on this image.


He was quite static and I wondered if he was either frozen or unwell. However he suddenly disappeared from the viewfinder and as I looked up from the camera, a return visitor landed on the top of the birdhouse.... the lady from a few days ago......

 





Click here to comment on this image.

She was also surprised that the blackbird had gone.....



Click here to comment on this image.


I might sit in the armchair again tomorrow and see what else comes by. 👍

.

Last edited on Mon Dec 7th, 2020 21:09 by Eric



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Posted by jk: Tue Dec 8th, 2020 08:22 548th Post
Seems like you comfy chair is also a good hide.
I think that it is better than venturing out into Covid world that is cold and grey.

BTW: My near neighbours have chickens and they tell me that DEFRA have instituted a 'pen and cover your chickens' program because of worries about bird flu.



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Posted by Iain: Tue Dec 8th, 2020 10:57 549th Post
Eric wrote:
I was sitting in the armchair looking out at the subzero icy garden and the myriad of blackbirds, starling, pigeons and doves feeding off the items we had scattered on the lawn. This dove was waiting for its turn....



Click here to comment on this image.






My attention turned to the blackbird at the base of the bird table. I believe I am right in saying it’s an immigrant from Netherlands (predominantly black beak and much more sooty looking than UK male blackbirds).....



Click here to comment on this image.


He was quite static and I wondered if he was either frozen or unwell. However he suddenly disappeared from the viewfinder and as I looked up from the camera, a return visitor landed on the top of the birdhouse.... the lady from a few days ago......

 





Click here to comment on this image.

She was also surprised that the blackbird had gone.....



Click here to comment on this image.


I might sit in the armchair again tomorrow and see what else comes by. 👍

.
Nice set of images Eric. Like the Collared  dove.
It might not last long with that Sparrowhawk about.



Posted by Eric: Tue Dec 8th, 2020 13:35 550th Post
Iain wrote:
Nice set of images Eric. Like the Collared  dove.
It might not last long with that Sparrowhawk about.
Yes...it almost looked like it was fixed on a baited hook .....ready meal 😆



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Posted by Graham Whistler: Tue Dec 8th, 2020 22:21 551st Post
Sorry more starlings on the flutter butter. D500 18-140mm lens at 140mm Camera on tripod with TW-283 wifi remote warm indoors! 1/2000 sec f7.1 ISO 3200 AFC 9 point and 10 fps. I have also had another go with Nikon SnapBridgelinked to my iPhone SE but not good with Bluetooth through glass and 10 fps crashed it at once!

Click here to comment on this image.



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Posted by Eric: Tue Dec 8th, 2020 22:42 552nd Post
Graham Whistler wrote:
Sorry more starlings on the flutter butter. D500 18-140mm lens at 140mm Camera on tripod with TW-283 wifi remote warm indoors! 1/2000 sec f7.1 ISO 3200 AFC 9 point and 10 fps. I have also had another go with Nikon SnapBridgelinked to my iPhone SE but not good with Bluetooth through glass and 10 fps crashed it at once!

Click here to comment on this image.
Nicely framed action shot....from your armchair as well. 😆 

I still think the D850 is better for ISOs over 2000. Have you tried that DX lens on the D850? It might give you the best of both worlds?



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Posted by Iain: Wed Dec 9th, 2020 12:05 553rd Post
I have found that the D500 gets noisy at 1000iso to about 4000 but at 6400 mine is clean again. If I’m going to know I need between 1000 - 4000 I use the old D3.



Posted by jk: Wed Dec 9th, 2020 12:11 554th Post
Iain wrote:
I have found that the D500 gets noisy at 1000iso to about 4000 but at 6400 mine is clean again. If I’m going to know I need between 1000 - 4000 I use the old D3. I agree that over 1600 ISO it becomes noisy but I never tried it higher up.
Another thing to test.
The D500 is not in the same class as the D850 wrt noise.

When you consider the 45MP of the D850 with the 21MP of the D500 then it really should do better.  I know that the FX tends to work better than DX due to photo site size.
Maybe we should be thinking of a D510 coming with the new EXPEED6 support chips as these help to reduce the image noise.



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Posted by Graham Whistler: Wed Dec 9th, 2020 12:49 555th Post
I agree the D850 is very much better re high ISO noise but just used the D500 for this test and the noise can be sorted quite well in Photoshop. 
Just had a Christmas card from an old friend from the very early days of our forum: Carol Steele she is retired from professional photography, still in Devon but still using a D800 just had a good talk on the phone.



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Posted by Eric: Wed Dec 9th, 2020 15:40 556th Post
Iain wrote:
I have found that the D500 gets noisy at 1000iso to about 4000 but at 6400 mine is clean again. If I’m going to know I need between 1000 - 4000 I use the old D3. That’s interesting Iain. I feel a test coming on, weather permitting, tomorrow.


I’ve long criticised Nikon for pushing ‘acceptable’ noise at much higher levels whilst the improvement at lower levels has lagged behind. 

My D3 was relatively noise free to around 3000iso outdoors and 2000iso indoors. I would have much preferred this noise free ceiling to be lifted to around 5000, rather than being able to have noisey images at 64,400! The D850 is little better than the D3 below 2000 and probably inferior at 3000!



Whilst I accept that software can reduce noise, they all work by softening the image to some degree. Though this can be managed reasonably well with a bit of precision, the fact remains if noise were not there in the first instance, the image wouldn’t need softening...... quite the reverse, it would respond to sharpening even better.

A camera that achieves noise free quality up to 5000 without any post processing intervention would get my vote.

Last edited on Wed Dec 9th, 2020 16:39 by Eric



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Posted by jk: Wed Dec 9th, 2020 16:01 557th Post
Eric wrote:
That’s interesting Iain. I feel a test coming on, weather permitting, tomorrow.


I’ve long criticised Nikon for pushing ‘acceptable’ noise at much higher levels whilst the improvement at lower levels has lagged behind. 

My D3 was relatively noise free to around 3000iso outdoors and 2000iso indoors. I would have much preferred this noise free ceiling to be lifted to around 5000, rather than being able to have noisey images at 64,400! The D850 is little better than the D3 below 2000 and probably inferior at 3000!



Whilst I accept that software can reduce noise, they all work by softening the image to some degree. Whilst that can be managed reasonably well with a bit of precision, the fact remains if noise were not there in the first instance, the image wouldn’t need softening...... quite the reverse, it would respond to sharpening even better.

A camera that achieves noise free quality up to 5000 without any post processing intervention would get my vote.
I used to use my D3 at ISO 3200 but my D3S works at ISO 6400.

My D850 seems to work very well, but I havent really pushed it past ISO 3200.


I agree a camera with smooth noiseless results to ISO 6400 would be a real winner but I am sure that the cut-off limits for others such as sports shooters might be ISO 12800.



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Posted by Eric: Wed Dec 9th, 2020 16:42 558th Post
That’s true...but they wouldn’t be buying a D850. More likely a D6,7,8 for speed and extra durability.



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Posted by jk: Wed Dec 9th, 2020 20:03 559th Post
Z9 is also the logical next step as it should be a mirrorless D7!

I am all cameraed out.  45MP Z7 and D850 make me a contented soul.  No more lenses or cameras required.



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Posted by Richard_M: Wed Dec 9th, 2020 23:03 560th Post
An introduced bird into Australia, European Goldfinch

#1


#2


#3


#4


#5



Posted by Graham Whistler: Wed Dec 9th, 2020 23:14 561st Post
Super shots looks just like ours we have 1-5 in our garden most days.



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Posted by Richard_M: Thu Dec 10th, 2020 01:47 562nd Post
Graham Whistler wrote:
Super shots looks just like ours we have 1-5 in our garden most days. Thank you Graham

They are becoming more common each season. I was also surprised how common they are in New Zealand, the last time I visited.



Posted by Richard_M: Thu Dec 10th, 2020 01:56 563rd Post
Here are a few snaps from one of our trips to NZ. 

#1 Tui


#2 Tui


#3 European Goldfinch


#4 Sacred Kingfisher



Posted by jk: Thu Dec 10th, 2020 16:57 564th Post
Fine shots Richard.

Which camera did you use for the Goldfinch series?



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Posted by Richard_M: Fri Dec 11th, 2020 08:24 565th Post
jk wrote:
Fine shots Richard.

Which camera did you use for the Goldfinch series?
Thank you Jonathan. D500



I called past a local reserve this morning before work

#1 Eastern Yellow Robin


#2 Grey Shrike-thrush


#3 Rainbow Lorikeet


#4 White-plumed Honeyeater


#5 White-eared Honeyeater


#6 Common Bronzewing


#7 Willie Wagtail


#8 Australian White Ibis


#9 Australian White Ibis


#10 Australian White Ibis


#11 Sacred Kingfisher



Posted by blackfox: Sat Dec 12th, 2020 17:50 566th Post
a couple of shots of stonechats from a dull horrid rainy north Wales day yesterday . most at 6400iso with the olympus rig 

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Posted by jk: Sat Dec 12th, 2020 19:52 567th Post
Loving those stonechat photos @blackfox
Very good IQ considering ISO 6400 and 4/3 sensor.


4/3 sensor format is only 2/3 sized DX or 19.2 x 13 mm. (250mm square), I think this is the next APS-C (23.5 x 15.7mm) (370mm square) against FX (35.9x23.9)(858mm square)!!



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Posted by Richard_M: Sat Dec 12th, 2020 22:26 568th Post
A lovely morning for a wander around one of the local gardens

#1 Silvereye


#2 Rufous Whistler


#3 Red-browed Finch


#4 Eastern Spinebill


#5 Little Wattlebird


#6 Superb Fairy-wren


#7 Dusky Woodswallow


#8 Welcome Swallow


#9 New Holland Honeyeater



Posted by jk: Sun Dec 13th, 2020 07:34 569th Post
Love that Fairy-wren.  Spectacular plumage.
Never saw one when I was in Oz.



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Posted by Graham Whistler: Mon Dec 14th, 2020 12:07 570th Post
Those pixs from Aus are amazing! Sorry more Starlings on the Flutter Butter again today. Very dull so pushed the ISO to 4000 with Nikon 850 hardly any noise 1/1600 sec with Nikon 500 PF AF-S lens at f5.6 wide open. The camera on area focus and 10 frames per sec. Eric you are right about high ISO on the D850 I hardly ever use 4000 ISO but this is very low noise.

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Posted by Iain: Mon Dec 14th, 2020 14:30 571st Post
The D500 is great in good light like Richard has in Oz. Here in the uk if it’s dull I reach for the D3. 

Unfortunately I can’t afford a D850. :praying:



Posted by jk: Mon Dec 14th, 2020 15:59 572nd Post
I am disappointed that the D500 being great to almost useless due to noise is a step that occurs at such low ISO.  It is little better than the D300 in this aspect but the AF is so good that it does justify the upgrade tag.
The D850 is the new D3S. I never upgraded to the D4 or D5 as I just thought the D3S was so good the D4 seemed like a high cost upgrade for little value and while the D5 has great AF once you get used to the D850 it is just as good for my use.



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Posted by blackfox: Mon Dec 14th, 2020 18:11 573rd Post
jk wrote:
I am disappointed that the D500 being great to almost useless due to noise is a step that occurs at such low ISO.  It is little better than the D300 in this aspect but the AF is so good that it does justify the upgrade tag.
The D850 is the new D3S. I never upgraded to the D4 or D5 as I just thought the D3S was so good the D4 seemed like a high cost upgrade for little value and while the D5 has great AF once you get used to the D850 it is just as good for my use.
I'm sad that my dodgy ticker forced me into leaving nikon  I was getting some good stuff . I had just acquired a really good D3S if you remember which I had to send back as I  can no longer handle the weight . needs must I suppose and im still here taking pics within my own limitations .. happy xmas all



Posted by Iain: Mon Dec 14th, 2020 20:25 574th Post
jk wrote:
I am disappointed that the D500 being great to almost useless due to noise is a step that occurs at such low ISO.  It is little better than the D300 in this aspect but the AF is so good that it does justify the upgrade tag.
The D850 is the new D3S. I never upgraded to the D4 or D5 as I just thought the D3S was so good the D4 seemed like a high cost upgrade for little value and while the D5 has great AF once you get used to the D850 it is just as good for my use.
My relationship with the D500 is a bit love hate and seems to be more hate than love. I think that FF is better but it’s finding a compromise that I can afford. A D810 or D750 or D4 they have all been in my thoughts and all in my price range but as of yet I can’t make my mind up.

Any advice would be appreciated.

Last edited on Mon Dec 14th, 2020 20:31 by Iain



Posted by jk: Mon Dec 14th, 2020 20:56 575th Post
I think if you do birds, sports and news then the D500 is great if it had better high ISO noise handling.
The D850 is great but if you want a long lens for sports or birds then it gets expensive.  I would advise anyone wanting a landscape camera to go for either the Z7 or the D850.

I have no experience of the D750 as I already had the D600 and was and still am very happy with it but I prefer my Fuji (DX/APS-C) cameras as they are all 26MP and have superb lenses.
The old mantra of DX for sports and animals, FX for landscape and humans still holds.
The D500 in great light works brilliantly and it was great in Spain or Australia (look at Richard's bird images) where the light is so much brighter but here in UK it definitely a lesser camera.



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Posted by chrisbet: Mon Dec 14th, 2020 23:10 576th Post
I already had the D600 and was and still am very happy with it What is it that you find good about it?



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Posted by jk: Tue Dec 15th, 2020 10:11 577th Post
chrisbet wrote:
What is it that you find good about it? It is not so heavy and bulky as my D850 and its files are still pretty good.  I tend to use it less now I have the D800 and D850 but the 24MP files are neither so large that a big shoot takes up a large chunk of hard disk space no too low in resolution to look grainy.   The results are slightly better in good light than my D3S but in poor light the D3S is less noisy.  AF speed seems similar as well but the D3S is a little surer!  Since the D750 was larger and the same MP it is one of the reasons I didnt bother with it but went for the D800 then D850.  The quality out of the D850 and the speed of AF is excellent.  I think Nikon will struggle to improve it.

There are advantages with mirrorless over DSLR but the same is also true in reverse.  Horses for courses.



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Posted by Eric: Wed Dec 16th, 2020 09:31 578th Post
My D500 never gets used now, unless I have a sudden impulse to test it reassure myself the D850 is a ‘better’ camera.

I’ve always been a one camera person, only hanging onto an alternative while I make up my mind which one I prefer to use. 

By ‘prefer’, that invariably relates to handling of the camera just as much as the images it takes. I hung onto my D3 for many years because it just felt right and delivered faultlessly at 12mp. I had the D300 at the same time and sold it, despite it being an exceptionally good camera....because the D3 all round worked best.

Let’s face it, most of today’s DSLRs are more than adequate for our needs .....because it’s getting the lighting, framing and your preparedness right,  that capture the image. 

If the lighting is poor, switching to a camera that has minor ISO advantage is never going to satisfy. It’s the light that’s wrong....change it or if outdoors choose another day.

Last edited on Wed Dec 16th, 2020 09:42 by Eric



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Posted by Iain: Wed Dec 16th, 2020 09:37 579th Post
I have lost a bit of faith in the D500 and still prefer full frame. 
So still thinking.



Posted by Eric: Wed Dec 16th, 2020 10:04 580th Post
Iain wrote:
I have lost a bit of faith in the D500 and still prefer full frame. 
So still thinking.
I wouldn’t go for a D750 for birding.
Despite what I just said about most modern DSLRs being good for our purposes, the D750 buffer was lacking.
Even taking indoor room setting shots (with copious bracketing) I found myself having to wait for the buffer to clear.

It was however one of the earliest models and SD cards were slower back then. Maybe they upgraded the firmware, perhaps newer cards have helped it? Worth testing that specific feature before buying.

Felt lovely in the hand though.

That’s what endeared me to the D850...it has the same deep grip that feels more balanced in the hand than the D500 ...and many other bodies.



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Posted by jk: Wed Dec 16th, 2020 12:26 581st Post
I agree with Eric.
The D750 is not a cheaper D850 but an earlier lesser model from 2014, that hasnt had the latest tech from 2016 as applied to the D500 and D850.

Many people really like the D750 and it is very good IQ but as Eric says the buffer is not enough for fast shooting or action.  It is great for home use and the odd portrait and landscape but for serious use and professional day to day use it is lacking.



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Posted by GeoffR: Thu Dec 17th, 2020 10:59 582nd Post
The D4, despite opinions to the contrary, is a good upgrade from the D3. The focusing seems more capable and an extra 4MP makes a difference when cropping. The down side is that the EN-EL18 battery is massively over priced, the focus point joystick cover for vertical (portrait format) shooting is very easily displaced and a Nikon replacement is expensive but a cheap cap is £8 and easily fitted. XQD cards are very expensive, but still cheaper than CFExpress cards.

I have two D4 bodies and I prefer the output to that of the D3. If you really can't afford a D850 the D4 is a good option and is very solid.



Posted by jk: Thu Dec 17th, 2020 12:43 583rd Post
GeoffR wrote:
The D4, despite opinions to the contrary, is a good upgrade from the D3. The focusing seems more capable and an extra 4MP makes a difference when cropping. The down side is that the EN-EL18 battery is massively over priced, the focus point joystick cover for vertical (portrait format) shooting is very easily displaced and a Nikon replacement is expensive but a cheap cap is £8 and easily fitted. XQD cards are very expensive, but still cheaper than CFExpress cards.

I have two D4 bodies and I prefer the output to that of the D3. If you really can't afford a D850 the D4 is a good option and is very solid.
Geoff have you compared D4 with D5.

I think that Nikon have lost their way with respect to new models.
In the past certainly with the film models but also certainly up until the D3S it was a clear to see the advantages in the new model.
I really cant see this in the case of the later and latest models.


For example Iain with his D500 yes it is a better camera in my opinion and it is better than my D300 or D300S (my underwater cameras) but how much better than my D300S? 
The AF is better but the sensor having more MP is just as noisy.

The D850 is better than the D800 not only at a sensor level with 45MP v 36MP, and less noisy but also the AF is better and there are many new features.

My Z7 has now been superseded by the Z7ii, likewise the Z6 v Z6ii, but Nikon have not offered an update to the Z7/Z6 to allow the use of the new battery pack that is for the Z7ii/Z6ii.  This is a relatively simple update by the local country service department.  Similar things happened in the further past with the Nikon lenses being updated to Ai/Ais.



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Posted by Graham Whistler: Thu Dec 17th, 2020 18:56 584th Post
Little Egret in Farlington Marsh reserve this afternoon. Very low light but D850 with 500 PF coped well.

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Posted by jk: Thu Dec 17th, 2020 20:09 585th Post
Very fine capture and lovely image.
Thanks for sharing Graham.

I really would like to test my Nikon 200-500mm against your 500mm.



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Posted by blackfox: Fri Dec 18th, 2020 12:49 586th Post
a trip along the coast yesterday in a brief spell of winter sun combined with high spring tides got me some rather good purple sandpiper and turnstone shots olympus 1.mkii + olympus 100-400 lens hand held 

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Posted by blackfox: Fri Dec 18th, 2020 12:52 587th Post
and a message from a mate last night led to seeing this one of mine being used by the BBCon instagram .. what they didn't do was read the text as it was a play with photoshops sky replacement :applause::lol:

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Posted by jk: Fri Dec 18th, 2020 16:24 588th Post
Stunning light in those images @blackfox.



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Posted by Iain: Fri Dec 18th, 2020 16:51 589th Post
:offtopic: I have bought a D4 which is producing good results even in the c**p weather we are having up here at the moment.



Posted by GeoffR: Fri Dec 18th, 2020 17:38 590th Post
jk wrote:
Geoff have you compared D4 with D5.

I think that Nikon have lost their way with respect to new models.
In the past certainly with the film models but also certainly up until the D3S it was a clear to see the advantages in the new model.
I really cant see this in the case of the later and latest models.


For example Iain with his D500 yes it is a better camera in my opinion and it is better than my D300 or D300S (my underwater cameras) but how much better than my D300S? 
The AF is better but the sensor having more MP is just as noisy.

The D850 is better than the D800 not only at a sensor level with 45MP v 36MP, and less noisy but also the AF is better and there are many new features.

My Z7 has now been superseded by the Z7ii, likewise the Z6 v Z6ii, but Nikon have not offered an update to the Z7/Z6 to allow the use of the new battery pack that is for the Z7ii/Z6ii.  This is a relatively simple update by the local country service department.  Similar things happened in the further past with the Nikon lenses being updated to Ai/Ais.
No I haven't had my hands on a D5 but I would suggest that the D5 is what the D4 should have been (20MP) and the D5 should have moved up further. I know speed of transfer and file size are considerations for the target user so much more than 24MP would be wasted.

Nikon missed out a D400, which would have been a DX version of the D4 and probably lost sales to the 5000 and 7000 series, people who would have bought the D500 had a D400 been in between the D300s and D500. The used market is important because being able to trade up matters.

The D800 doesn't do anything for me but the D850 looks good, if fairly expensive even used.

The Z series likewise don't appeal, largely because of the mess Nikon have made with the grips. A good design would have had the grip designed as if it were a part of the camera rather than just a box hung underneath. Had they got that right the FTZ adaptor wouldn't have had an unusable tripod socket.

The other thing that annoys me is that there was no need to change the battery between the D3 and D4, the EN-EL18c has exactly the same capacity as the EN-EL4a yet Nikon stated that Japanese law required a lower energy density. The latest iterations appear to have the same energy density so what was the point.



Posted by Graham Whistler: Fri Dec 18th, 2020 18:38 591st Post
Jeff super images, thanks for sharing them with us. Glad you picked up the RPS link about new software for your Olympus.



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Posted by Richard_M: Sat Dec 19th, 2020 08:23 592nd Post
I went to another reserve this morning. I haven't been to this reserve since before our COVID restrictions. Even though it is only 20mins drive from home, it was outside my 5km limit. Now we're getting back to some normality its great to get out and about.


#1 Australasian Darter (Male)


#2 Australasian Darter (Female)


#3 Great Cormorant


#4 Straw-necked Ibis


#5 Striated Pardalote


#6 Blue-billed Duck (Male)


#7 Golden-headed Cisticola doing the splits


#8 Little Pied Cormorant


#9 Galah


#10 I also managed to photograph a Fox while there :)



Posted by jk: Sat Dec 19th, 2020 08:31 593rd Post
Great set of images Richard.

Love #7 Golden-headed Cisticola doing the splits.  So sharp and well timed.
I admire your patience and skill.



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Posted by jk: Sat Dec 19th, 2020 08:31 594th Post
Great set of images Richard.

Love #7 Golden-headed Cisticola doing the splits.  So sharp and well timed.
I admire your patience and skill.

How close are you to where Richard_R lives?



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Posted by Richard_M: Sat Dec 19th, 2020 09:09 595th Post
jk wrote:
Great set of images Richard.

Love #7 Golden-headed Cisticola doing the splits.  So sharp and well timed.
I admire your patience and skill.
Thank you Johnathan

No patience when it comes to me and photography. I generally only go for an hour sometimes a little longer when I go birding depending on the size of the reserve. Any longer than that I'm usually bored. I mainly visit local reserves for this reason, which also restricts the variety of birds to see and photograph.



Posted by Robert: Sat Dec 19th, 2020 10:25 596th Post
Richard_M wrote:
Thank you Johnathan

No patience when it comes to me and photography. I generally only go for an hour sometimes a little longer when I go birding depending on the size of the reserve. Any longer than that I'm usually bored. I mainly visit local reserves for this reason, which also restricts the variety of birds to see and photograph.
I can't wait to see the wider variety if you ever get the urge to go further from home!

Amazing images compared with our mostly somewhat dull and drab species in the UK.  Thanks for posting.



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Posted by Graham Whistler: Sat Dec 19th, 2020 10:53 597th Post
Richard more super images when can I jump on a plane with my camera and come and see you!!!!?



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Posted by Eric: Sat Dec 19th, 2020 11:41 598th Post
Richard_M wrote:
Thank you Johnathan

No patience when it comes to me and photography. I generally only go for an hour sometimes a little longer when I go birding depending on the size of the reserve. Any longer than that I'm usually bored. I mainly visit local reserves for this reason, which also restricts the variety of birds to see and photograph.
I agree with your approach.

In fact, from a pure bird ‘observation’ point of view, I’ve always said 20mins in a hide and you know what’s about. If nothing shows, move on. Of course if your aim is photographing the birds, you may have to stay longer, if only to get more / better opportunities.



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Posted by jk: Sat Dec 19th, 2020 12:48 599th Post
Then you must go at the best times!

Did you use the D500 for the "Golden-headed Cisticola doing the splits", I cant see any EXIF details?



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Posted by Iain: Sat Dec 19th, 2020 13:14 600th Post
One form the D4 a Chaffie.
DN4_8564-Edit by Iain Clyne, on Flickr



Posted by jk: Sat Dec 19th, 2020 13:19 601st Post
Looks good, Iain.
I can see why GeoffR likes the D4.



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Posted by Robert: Sat Dec 19th, 2020 17:36 602nd Post
Pennies well spent Iain!



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Posted by Richard_M: Sat Dec 19th, 2020 18:52 603rd Post
Robert wrote:
I can't wait to see the wider variety if you ever get the urge to go further from home!

Amazing images compared with our mostly somewhat dull and drab species in the UK.  Thanks for posting.
Thank you Robert

There are reportedly 828 bird species in Australia

Seeing many of the birds being posted on local social media groups, does bring home how many I have not seen



Posted by Richard_M: Sat Dec 19th, 2020 18:56 604th Post
Graham Whistler wrote:
Richard more super images when can I jump on a plane with my camera and come and see you!!!!?
Thank you Graham

If you're ever down our neck of the woods, I'm sure we'll be able to show you some of the local bird life.



Posted by Richard_M: Sat Dec 19th, 2020 19:05 605th Post
Eric wrote:
I agree with your approach.

In fact, from a pure bird ‘observation’ point of view, I’ve always said 20mins in a hide and you know what’s about. If nothing shows, move on. Of course if your aim is photographing the birds, you may have to stay longer, if only to get more / better opportunities.
I agree, it usually doesn't take too long to know if you're likely to see many birds or not. Knowing where popular spots are for birds does help as well. This is where social media has helped, but also has been detrimental. When a locally rare bird has been spotted in a reserve, it can cause a big influx of birders which ultimately causes distress for the birds. Particularly when they are Owls, and photographer's harass them while they sleep so they open their eyes.



Posted by Richard_M: Sat Dec 19th, 2020 19:16 606th Post
jk wrote:
Then you must go at the best times!

Did you use the D500 for the "Golden-headed Cisticola doing the splits", I cant see any EXIF details?
I usually try to be at a reserve about an hour after sunrise to ensure there is plenty of light and the sun is still low. It also allows me to observe birds of prey once the temp starts to rise to hopefully be in a good spot to see and hopefully photograph them.

Yes I did use the D500 with 200-500mm lens
Here is another image taken not long after the previous one.



Posted by Iain: Sat Dec 19th, 2020 20:13 607th Post
Robert wrote:
Pennies well spent Iain! There is something about the images that the big pro Nikon’s produce.



Posted by Eric: Sun Dec 20th, 2020 10:20 608th Post
Trying out the new Click & Collect service.



I wondered why there were no birds on the feeders this morning.....




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Posted by Eric: Sun Dec 20th, 2020 11:50 609th Post
Two frames...and she saw me through the patio doors...gone 😞 




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Posted by jk: Sun Dec 20th, 2020 15:19 610th Post
Looks like you have a new garden pet Eric.
:thumbs:



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Posted by Iain: Mon Dec 21st, 2020 13:46 611th Post
Eric wrote:
Trying out the new Click & Collect service.



I wondered why there were no birds on the feeders this morning.....




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Looks like its thinking this Bl***y click and collect service is useless!



Posted by chrisbet: Mon Dec 21st, 2020 15:00 612th Post
Iain wrote:
Looks like its thinking this Bl***y click and collect service is useless! That's because he should have used the cluck & collect service instead .. :lol:



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Posted by jk: Tue Dec 22nd, 2020 17:22 613th Post
Eric's food bill just got more expensive.   Steak bits required!!!



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Posted by Eric: Wed Dec 30th, 2020 11:38 614th Post
No photographic record, it was over before my coffee cup hit the carpet:whip:

Sat calmly sipping my 11am brew when I was startled by a mass of furred and feathered bodies bouncing across the patio. 

The sparrow hawk had swooped in to grab a blackbird at the same time as the local feline assassin had gone for the same blackbird. 
Those talons would have hurt the moggy but as is often the case with birds of prey, despite potentially more lethal weaponry they don’t risk flight incapacity in a fight and it flapped a hasty retreat. 
The blackbird sat stunned into motionless. So did the cat a mere foot away from his prey.

I unlocked the patio door (that sound is all that’s needed) and the cat was off. The bird sat motionless. I noticed it was blood red in the beak....not a good sign.

I decided to leave it and let nature take its course....but kept an eye out for the cats return.

15mins later the bird was still sat motionless there.

After 20mins I decided to go out and ‘do something’. But as I approached the window the blackbird turned its head to reveal it was holding a red holly berry in its mouth, not blood. One click of the door lock and ...whoosh....it flew off down the garden. One lucky blackbird. Wonder if he had time to swallow that berry?

About 20 mins later a black and white figure slinked across the patio to the spot where the blackbird had sat. The bird had clearly left the scent of his panic...... if not a residue. 😂 

Happy New Year to everyone....and the blackbird.

Last edited on Wed Dec 30th, 2020 11:42 by Eric



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Posted by jk: Thu Dec 31st, 2020 07:52 615th Post
Well another year nearly finished.  We are going to need a new Bird Photography thread for the new year.
I hope that 2021 is a more productive year than 2020.
A Happy and Vaccinated New Year to you all.



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Posted by Iain: Thu Dec 31st, 2020 09:01 616th Post
Happy new year everyone, let’s hope we’re as lucky this year as Eric’s blackbird.


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